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Month: September, 2016

Four Mitchell residents indicted on drug charges

Thursday, September 15, 2016

Attorney General Marty Jackley announced today that four individuals have been indicted by a Davison County Grand Jury on drug related charges. Case stemmed as a result of a search conducted at parolee Jared Nespor’s residence.

“Parole is a time and opportunity for individuals that have made mistakes to demonstrate that they want and can be productive and law abiding citizens. It is not a get out of jail free card, and continued criminal violations and conduct while on parole will not be tolerated,” said Jackley.

Mellissa Mae Schuppan, 27, Mitchell

- One count of possession with intent to distribute one pound or more of marijuana, class 3 felony, punishable by up to 15 years in the state penitentiary and/or $30,000 fine

- One count of possession with intent to distribute one pound or more of marijuana in a drug free zone, class 4 felony, punishable by up to 10 years in the state penitentiary and/or $20,000 fine

- One count of possession of one to ten pounds of marijuana, class 4 felony, punishable by up to 10 years in the state penitentiary and/or $20,000 fine

- One count of possession of a controlled substance, methamphetamine, class 5 felony, punishable by up to 5 years in the state penitentiary and/or $10,000 fine

- One count of unauthorized ingestion of a controlled substance, methamphetamine, class 5 felony, punishable by up to 5 years in the state penitentiary and/or $10,000 fine

- One count of unauthorized ingestion of a controlled substance, cocaine, class 5 felony, punishable by up to 5 years in the state penitentiary and/or $10,000 fine.

Mark Daniel Leach, 34, Mitchell

- One count of possession of a controlled substance, methamphetamine, class 5 felony, punishable by up to 5 years in the state penitentiary and/or $10,000 fine

- One count of unauthorized ingestion of a controlled substance, methamphetamine, class 5 felony, punishable by up to 5 years in the state penitentiary and/or $10,000 fine

- One count of unauthorized ingestion of a controlled substance, cocaine, class 5 felony, punishable by up to 5 years in the state penitentiary and/or $10,000 fine

- One count of unauthorized ingestion of a controlled substance, opiates, class 5 felony, punishable by up to 5 years in the state penitentiary and/or $10,000 fine

- One count of possession of two ounces or less of marijuana, class 1 misdemeanor

- One count of possession of drug paraphernalia, class 2 misdemeanor

Skila Kay Schuppan, 35, Mitchell

- One count of possession of a controlled substance, methamphetamine, class 5 felony, punishable by up to 5 years in the state penitentiary and/or $10,000 fine

- One count of unauthorized ingestion of a controlled substance, methamphetamine, class 5 felony, punishable by up to 5 years in the state penitentiary and/or $10,000 fine

- One count of possession of two ounces or less of marijuana, class 1 misdemeanor

- One count of possession of drug paraphernalia, class 2 misdemeanor

Jared Jerome Nespor, 27, Mitchell

- One count of possession with intent to distribute one pound or more of marijuana, class 3 felony, punishable by up to 15 years in the state penitentiary and/or $30,000 fine

- One count of possession with intent to distribute one pound or more of marijuana in a drug free zone, class 4 felony, punishable by up to 10 years in the state penitentiary and/or $20,000 fine.

- One count of possession of one to ten pounds of marijuana, class 4 felony, punishable by up to 10 years in the state penitentiary and/or $20,000 fine

One count of possession of a controlled substance, methamphetamine, class 5 felony, punishable by up to 5 years in the state penitentiary and/or $10,000 fine.

All these individuals are presumed innocent until such time as proven guilty.

This case is being investigated by the Mitchell Police Department and prosecuted by the Attorney General’s Office.


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Two Mitchell residents indicted on drug charges

Thursday, September 15, 2016

Attorney General Marty Jackley announced today that two individuals have been indicted by a Davison County Grand Jury on drug related charges. Charges stem from a probation search of a residence belonging to Jordan Lee Muntefering.

“Probation is a time and opportunity for individuals that have made mistakes to demonstrate that they want and can be productive and law abiding citizens. It is not a get out of jail free card, and continued criminal violations and conduct while on probation will not be tolerated,” said Jackley.

Kaitlin Elizabeth Minder, 23, Mitchell

- One count of possession of a controlled substance with intent to distribute, cocaine, class 4 felony, punishable by up to 10 years in the state penitentiary and/or $20,000 fine

- One count of possession of a controlled substance with intent to distribute in a drug free zone, cocaine, class 4 felony, punishable by up to 10 years in the state penitentiary and/or $20,000 fine

- One count of possession of a controlled substance, cocaine, class 5 felony, punishable by up to 5 years in the state penitentiary and/or $10,000 fine.

- One count of possession of a controlled substance with intent to distribute, methamphetamine, class 4 felony, punishable by up to 10 years in the state penitentiary and/or $20,000 fine.

- One count of possession of a controlled substance with intent to distribute in a drug free zone, methamphetamine, class 4 felony, punishable by up to 10 years in the state penitentiary and/or $20,000 fine.

- One count of possession of a controlled substance, methamphetamine, class 5 felony, punishable by up to 5 years in the state penitentiary and/or $10,000 fine.

- One count of possession with intent to distribute in a drug free zone more than ounce but less than one-half pound of marijuana, class 4 felony, punishable by up to 10 years in the state penitentiary and/or $20,000 fine

- One count of possession with intent to distribute more than one ounce but less than one-half pound of marijuana, class 5 felony, punishable by up to 5 years in the state penitentiary and/or $10,000 fine

- One count of possession of more than two ounces but less than on-half pound of marijuana, class 6 felony, punishable by up to 2 years in the state penitentiary and/or $4,000 fine

- One count of possession of drug paraphernalia, class 2 misdemeanor.

 

Jordan Lee Muntefering, 27, Mitchell

- One count of possession of a controlled substance with intent to distribute, cocaine, class 4 felony, punishable by up to 10 years in the state penitentiary and/or $20,000 fine

- One count of possession of a controlled substance with intent to distribute in a drug free zone, cocaine, class 4 felony, punishable by up to 10 years in the state penitentiary and/or $20,000 fine

- One count of possession of a controlled substance, cocaine, class 5 felony, punishable by up to 5 years in the state penitentiary and/or $10,000 fine.

- One count of possession of a controlled substance with intent to distribute, methamphetamine, class 4 felony, punishable by up to 10 years in the state penitentiary and/or $20,000 fine.

- One count of possession of a controlled substance with intent to distribute in a drug free zone, methamphetamine, class 4 felony, punishable by up to 10 years in the state penitentiary and/or $20,000 fine.

- One count of possession of a controlled substance, methamphetamine, class 5 felony, punishable by up to 5 years in the state penitentiary and/or $10,000 fine.

- One count of possession with intent to distribute in a drug free zone more than one ounce but less than one-half pound of marijuana, class 4 felony, punishable by up to 10 years in the state penitentiary and/or $20,000 fine.

- One count of possession with intent to distribute more than one have ounce but less than one-half pound of marijuana, class 5 felony, punishable by up to 5 years in the state penitentiary and/or $10,000 fine.

 

SD AG
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DWU breaks ground on new black box theatre and welcome center

Thursday, September 15, 2016

Despite the rain, Dakota Wesleyan University carried on with its groundbreaking ceremony on what will be a new $1.2 million theatre and welcome center Thursday following Opening Convocation.

The ceremony took place inside the Sherman Center, rather than on location, due to the rain in Mitchell Thursday morning. The theatre will be built attached to the south side of Dakota Discovery Museum, on the east side of campus. The project includes a black-box theatre, office space, dressing rooms, bathrooms, workshop and a green room. There will also be a new welcome center for the university and museum.

DWU faculty and staff also donated toward the project, but the major donors for the project include: Ron and Sheilah Gates, of Mitchell, The Leland Case Trust; The Sam F. Weller Family Foundation, of Mitchell; Mike and Lesta Turchen of Hill City; the Mitchell Area Charitable Foundation; and Mark Puetz and Katie Murphy, of Mitchell.

The facility is expected to open by spring semester 2018.

“Our theatre students and I are absolutely ecstatic that we will soon be honing our craft and presenting our productions in a space that is being built for a sole purpose and that is theatrical performances,” said Dan Miller, theatre director and professor. “We are so grateful for the support and investment that these donors are making in furthering arts education.”

The groundbreaking ceremony followed Opening Convocation Thursday, where Ron and Sheilah Gates were also thanked and honored through the naming of the theatre department: The Ron and Sheilah Gates Department of Theatre.

“The city of Mitchell is incredibly lucky to have such friends as Ron and Sheilah; their generosity of spirit is felt throughout the community but especially for us on campus through the extraordinary opportunities our students have received through their support,” said DWU President Amy Novak.

The Gates donated to the university to expand its music program just a few years ago, which resulted in the hiring of a full-time instrumental faculty member and the creation of the Tiger Pep Band, which performs for local athletic events. The university thanked the Gates for this gift by creating the Ron and Sheilah Gates Department of Music.

“They are such giving and warm people who take a genuine interest in the students’ lives, come to their events, cheer them on individually, get to know them,” Novak said. “With their personal love of the arts, it is not surprising that they see the value in investing in the arts, so it is not with surprise that we accept their gift, or the gifts of all the donors – it’s with humility that they chose to invest it here.”

Dakota Wesleyan was founded in 1885 and its theatre program has evolved from the earliest years of elocution, rhetoric and oratory to the development of English drama courses in the early part of the 20th century. During the 1920s, Shakespeare and dramatic interpretation courses were offered to students and in the early ’30s, DWU hired a part-time drama teacher. By 1935, DWU made dramatic art its own department with participants from the university as well as the community.

Hughes Hall, built in 1912 as Science Hall, holds Patten-Wing Theatre, which was built as a chapel and auditorium. Music performances, as well as plays, have been performed there but the stage is too small for larger productions.

Miller built the current theatre-in-the-round in a classroom in upper Hughes Hall four years ago, which seats up to 50 people. The new black box theatre will be large enough to fit up to 150 audience members, depending on stage setup, and allow more versatile performances for setups, as well as the technology needed to run a show.

“Theatre students will have more room and up-to-date equipment to learn with, and this will also provide a space for other cultural events in the future, we hope,” Novak said.

 


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Lake Mitchell public input session scheduled

Wednesday, September 14, 2016

The City of Mitchell is hosting a public forum regarding a Lake Mitchell improvement plan September 21st at the MTI Technology Center Amphitheater.

FYRA Engineering will present from 6:00 pm until 6:30 pm followed by discussion with a Public Question & Answer period from 6:30 pm-8:00 pm

For more information, please contact Park and Rec. Director Nathan Powell at 605-995-8450.


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LeAnn Rimes coming to the Corn Palace

Monday, September 12, 2016

Break out the tinsel, candy canes and hang your stockings because world renowned Grammy Award® winning vocalist, LeAnn Rimes is packing up her sleigh and hitting the road this December for her annual holiday themed tour called, “Today is Christmas Tour 2016.” Rimes will be performing at the Corn Palace on Friday, December 9th, 2016. Presale tickets and VIP Packages will be available for Fan Club members on September 21th at 10:00 AM CST. Tickets go on-sale to the general public on September 23rd at 10:00 AM CST.

City of Mitchell


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DWU announces homecoming activities

Monday, September 12, 2016

Dakota Wesleyan University’s Blue & White Days kicks off Thursday with the university’s Academic Convocation, which will include a groundbreaking for a new theatre.

DWU has a full weekend of events planned for homecoming this year, and much like in the past, the university is combining homecoming with a groundbreaking. Officials will break ground for a new DWU theatre and welcome center on the south side of the Dakota Discovery Museum on Thursday, Sept. 15. The donors’ names will be announced that morning, as will the theatre’s department’s new name.

Academic Convocation with a theatre dedication ceremony will take place at 11 a.m., Thursday, in the Sherman Center, followed by a groundbreaking ceremony at 11:30 a.m. at the museum. Both are open to the public.

The theatre will be built alongside and attached to the museum, with a black-box theatre, office space, dressing rooms, bathrooms, workshop and a green room. The museum will also see a renovation with a new DWU welcome center.

Friday, Sept. 16

Blue & White Days will begin early on Friday with registration for alumni at the McGovern Library beginning at 9 a.m. and running until 3 p.m. There will also be guided campus tours at 10 a.m. and 2 p.m.

There will be a Blue & White Days Golf Outing Friday at Wild Oak Golf Course. The contest begins at 10 a.m. and the shotgun start is at 11 a.m. All proceeds go to the DWU golf program. Cost to participate is $75 per person, which includes green fees, cart fees, pin prizes, a meal and gift. A team sponsorship is $300 which includes four-person team, corporate sign displayed, corporate name announced, all fees, and pin prizes. There is also a hole sponsorship available for $100 which includes corporate sign displayed on given hole and corporate name announced several times throughout the morning. To register, email golf coach, Chris Gomez, at chgomez@dwu.edu.

The Legacy Banquet will be at 6 p.m. Friday, honoring alumni, friends and donors. Three Distinguished Alumni Awards will be given to: Curtis Rolfe, class of 1957, from the College of Arts and Humanities; Bob Kjelden, class of 1971, from the College of Leadership and Public Service; and Peter Masella, class of 1965, from the Donna Starr Christen College of Healthcare, Fitness and Sciences. All attendees are required to preregister through the alumni office, 605-995-2603 or online at https://store.dwu.edu/BWDays/.

The Pep Rally, Coronation and burning of the “W” will follow, beginning at 9 p.m. in the DWU/Avera Sports and Wellness Complex. All are welcome to attend.

Saturday, Sept. 17

The Tiger Trail Trek – a 5K run – will begin at Kiwanis Park at 8 a.m. To register for this, go to https://store.dwu.edu/BWDays/.

The alumni gathering will be under the tent as always in CorTrust Bank’s parking lot on Main Street, beginning at 9:30 a.m. with coffee and donuts for a freewill donation.

The Blue & White Day parade begins at 10 a.m. on Mitchell’s Main Street, followed by the tailgate party at 11:30 a.m. at Joe Quintal Field with DWU’s food service cooking up pulled pork sandwiches. The DWU football game, DWU vs. Doane College, will be at 1 p.m. at Joe Quintal Field.

The Blue & White Unite! alumni reunion will be from 5 to 8 p.m. Saturday at County Fair Banquet Hall. This is for all classes, but also honoring athletic training graduates. This is $10 per person and reservations are appreciated, just email alumni@dwu.edu or call 995-2603.

In addition to the homecoming activities, DWU’s theatre department will also open its theatre season with the comedy, “Boeing, Boeing,” in the Patten-Wing Theatre. Tickets are $7 at the door and times are 7:30 p.m., Friday-Saturday, Sept. 16-17 and 23-24; and 2 p.m. on Sundays, Sept. 18 and 25.

 

DWU

 


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High risk inmate set for release

Thursday, September 8, 2016

Corrections Secretary Denny Kaemingk is providing notification to law enforcement and the public about the pending release of a state prison inmate.

Inmate Wayne Tobias, age 30, is currently serving a 5-year sentence for simple assault on a law enforcement officer.

Tobias is white, 5-feet-10-inches tall and weighs approximately 190 pounds.

Pursuant to Tobias’ judgment of conviction, his sentence expires on Sept. 8, 2016. Because he will have completed his full sentence, Tobias must be released from prison. He will not be under supervision, such as parole. DOC does not have jurisdiction to supervise an offender who has completed their entire sentence inside the prison.

“Based on his criminal history, institutional disciplinary record and institutional assessments that indicate a high risk for committing future acts of violence, I am alerting law enforcement and the public of this offender’s pending release from prison,” said Kaemingk.

Tobias has indicated he plans to live in Sioux Falls upon his release.

This specific notification is in addition to the letters currently sent to law enforcement and notices provided to the Division of Criminal Investigation each month.

 Since 2011, the Department of Corrections has issued a total of eight public notices of pending high risk inmate releases and one public notice of a high profile inmate release.

                                              


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Mayor Jerry Toomey explains FYRA Plan

Thursday, September 8, 2016

The FYRA Plan

The following provides an explanation as to why FYRA calls this a PLAN and not a STUDY. I am inclined to agree with them. I can't change what people want to call it, but this is FYRA's position as to why this is “not just another study”.

After this initial phase (Steps 1‐2‐3), there will certainly be some DIRECTION, but a PLAN (as the agencies that will be involved call it) cannot be close to being done for this initial task amount. The next phase (if we move forward with FYRA) will cost between $100,000‐$300,000 but it will also be at this point when we know what grant funding will be available and what our share of this cost will be. Based on FYRA's past grant funding experience, it is anticipated that the City of Mitchell's share will be between 25%‐40%.

This first phase (Steps 123) will be the development of a tool that can provide us answers. A study would tell you what the problems are...do past studies tell you what to do QUALITATIVELY, or QUANTITATIVELY? The bottom line is, that we all know that if we improve the watershed, keep cows from "wallowing in the creek" and use less fertilizers, etc. that nutrient delivery will improve. Does anybody know if that will improve ENOUGH TO MAKE A DIFFERENCE? The answer is NO....at this time, no one knows what level of impact any of those will have. IF they think they know, how do they know? (They don't...)

FYRA is developing a tool to provide these answers. No one else has done that to date. FYRA will be collecting some data to make their tool as good as it can possibly be, but they are not studying that data ‐ They are formulating a model to put the existing data and new data to work. This phase is the first time that something is getting done! What past study has done that?

This effort:

1. Develops a tool (water/nutrient mass balance) that can be used to formulate a plan

2. Quantifies and segregates the source of the nutrients so that targeted efforts can be made to reduce them.

3. Identifies (through the identification of sources) agencies and grant programs available to help meet nutrient reduction goals.

4. Begins the public educational process and brings potential partnership agencies to the table to help establish goals for the lake.

For those that like to say this is a study, show me one past study that accomplished even ONE of these four above items.

After these four steps, we will likely have some smaller actions that we as a community can start doing immediately while we work on addressing the larger more complicated issues.

The important thing that we must all keep in mind is how important is Lake Mitchell to our city? It is not only a backup source for our water supply, it is also a "quality of life" issue for recreational use that includes fishing, boating, skiing, swimming, camping, bike trails and walking paths. It was identified in a recent marketing study as a key resource to help our community with workforce development and retention. Let us not forget the economic impact it has for our community. Lake Mitchell is currently on the EPA's list of "impaired" lakes.

Lake Mitchell is not going to fix itself and will only continue to get worse. On 09/07/16, I attended a Mayor's Water Summit in Sioux Falls. Cities are spending millions to create man‐made lakes for the reasons noted above. We have a lake…..it needs our help…..let's take care of it.

Mayor Jerry Toomey


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Strong storms slam Springfield

Monday, September 5, 2016

Overnight storms destroyed four homes, damaged buildings, downed trees and caused minor injuries in Springfield.

The Bon Homme County Emergency Management Office says dozens of homes were damaged and several destroyed.

National Weather Service meteorologist Todd Heitkamp says the damage was caused by winds between 100 mph and 110 mph. About 300 volunteers are assisting.

Photo courtesy Jerry Oster, WNAX, Yankton

Power was knocked out on the south side of Springfield and the water treatment plant was damaged.

Local officials set up a command center to evaluate damage and begin cleanup. People who want to help with cleanup can go to the city's community center. 

Copyright 2016 The Associated Press


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